Thanks! (more client praise)

We were grateful to recently receive these two comments from clients whose matters we resolved:

Client 9 (January 2015): “You gave me a voice when I needed it most. Knowing that I had you helping me gave me the strength to hang in there.  I can’t believe I ended up with most everything I asked for. I even got some things that I never dreamed I would get back!”

Client 8 (January 2015): “Just wanted to say thank you for your help with the letter. You are truly a godsend. Not only are you knowledgeable but also genuinely caring to a stranger. We need more attorneys like you in this world.”

Read praise from seven other clients here.

Each dispute is different and its outcome depends on the underlying facts as well as factors beyond the control of you or the attorneys, but our goal is to leave every client as happy as those quoted above. Speaking of happiness, here’s a beach photo by attorney David Schleicher to help get your weekend off to a good start.

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Flirting at Work?

secret    Workplace flirting is not rewarded even in environments where it is encouraged, according to this interesting article on a recent study of law firms. On a related note, our experience in representing both the harassed and those accused of harassing, in both the federal and private sector, is that there remain a large number of managers–even at very high levels–who consider their position of power a license to sexually harass those working for them.

    Gentlemen: a good rule of thumb is that if you would not act that way at work if your mother or sister or wife were present, then you probably shouldn’t act that way in their absence either. An old standby alternative is, “How would what I’m doing look if covered on the front page of the Washington Post?”

Two Free Resources on Criminal Records and Hiring Process

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Employers: If you are concerned about the legal minefield of using criminal records to screen out applicants, here’s a link to a pdf of an employee-side perspective (May 2013–as pictured above) on how to do it legally.  You also can go to the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law website for background on the by whom and why of the publication’s development.  If you would prefer a Q&A on the topic straight from Uncle Sam (April 2012), then instead go to EEOC’s website.  If you are a Texas-based employer, you also can give us a call with your questions.