Another AVVO Review

We just received notice from the Avvo.com website directory of attorneys of the following client review. Follow this link for the full review, other reviews, and an explanation of the website’s review process. While the outcome of each case turns on the particular facts and client involved, our goal is to leave everyone as pleased as this client:

Overall rating Excellent
Trustworthy Excellent
Responsive Excellent
Knowledgeable Excellent
Kept me informed Excellent
I recommend David Schleicher.
I hired David more than 3 years ago.
David handled my Government matter.
I have previously worked with 1-2 lawyers.

David and his firm have represented me since March 2009, and I’m fortunate and thankful for his expert knowledge of government employee, equal opportunity, and disabled employee rights, laws, and guidelines, as well as his counsel to help me through challenging and difficult law-related times. David is responsive and available, and when we speak and coordinate via email I’m certain that he’s completely focused on me and my needs. I also consider him to be exceedingly fair with his rate structure, and his staff diligently keeps me informed regarding status and cost breakdowns on all matters he works for me. I find him to be empathic while also ensuring I have a realistic view of options for the various situations he’s helped me address – always successfully in my favor. As a long-time federal employee, I never needed a lawyer’s counsel until 2009, and I’m grateful that David and his firm were my first choice, based on a coworker’s recommendation. David and his staff have confirmed my initial impression: he is THE government employee law professional. Look no further; if you need a lawyer on your side, David is the answer.

New Client Comments Posted

Over on our “client praise” page you will see we just added these comments:

I cannot thank you enough for all your assistance over the years. You have been a godsend to me.”

and from another client:

“Your professionalism in dealing with the agency speaks louder in what it does not say directly than in what it does say. Your writing covers a very sharp filet knife designed to cut to the issue and get the result.  I also appreciate your continued calm, focused approach. You have more than earned any and all fees. I cannot imagine going through this without your guidance and support.”

As noted in the disclaimer on that page, every case is different and the outcome depends on the facts involved, but our goal is to leave every client as pleased as those quoted on the page.

How to lose a case in 10 days

If you are one of the rare clients or attorneys who want to lose your case, a recent decision in a federal employee discrimination suit provides valuable direction:

1.  Seriously fail to comply with the court’s rules–don’t settle for technical violations.

2.  Don’t cite to specific evidence in the record when you are fighting summary judgment.

3.  Avoid citing cases that apply to the particulars of your case–reference only very general principles.

4.  Fail to ask to correct your errors when noted in your opponent’s reply brief.

5.  Most of all, treat judges “like pigs, hunting for truffles”–don’t you dare direct them to your case’s strong points.

The case is RODRÍGUEZ-MACHADO v. SHINSEKI, ___ F.3d ___ (1st Cir. Nov. 21, 2012).  Worth a read.